Why you don’t need to stay home the week we dig your pool

Most of our customers are tempted to take dig week off work. They want to be available if any last-minute decisions are required and to give our guys access to the house if needed. They also believe the work will be done to a higher standard or faster if they're on-premises to supervise. We understand that desire. Heck, we feel the same way when work is being done on our homes. But dig week isn't the best one to take off work, and here are six reasons why. 

  • Reason #1: We’ll get hold of you if we need to.

    Let’s say the crew encounters something unexpected when digging or a judgement call needs to be made about the project. This rarely happens, but it’s something our customers occasionally worry about. The crew aren’t the ones who will be making the decision or troubleshooting with you—even if you are at home. They’ll immediately contact the company owner and a senior Buds staff person will connect with you right away to discuss next steps. There’s no reason for you to be home to take the call.

  • Reason #2: The excavation crew doesn’t have the authority to make changes to the job.

    We work hard to make sure everything has been finalized well before the Big Dig, but the odd time a customer will want to change the scope once the excavation equipment is in their yard. The crew won’t have the authority to do this (and you wouldn’t want them to, anyway, since it could lead to surprise cost). Instead, you’ll have to call or email your Buds sales rep to discuss any changes that aren't on your contract, so that options and costs are agreed upon. If changes are required, you can make that call while you’re at work or after you’re home.

  • Reason #3: Our guys don’t need access to your house.

    Excavation and pool building is dirty work. The crew will be covered in mud and you don’t want them in your house. There’s no job-related reason for them to have access to your home, and if they need a bathroom, they’ll go elsewhere.

  • Reason #4: The owner is keeping an eye on your job.

    Bill Bell, who owns Buds, visits every job site during construction to ensure that the job is going according to plan and is of the highest quality. No one knows better than Bill what will make customers happy (or upset). Why not go to work, and let him be your eyes?

  • Reason #5: You can check things out after work.

    There isn’t any need for project check-ins between the homeowner and the excavation crew or the guys building the pool shell during dig week. The crew knows exactly what to do and gets right down to it during the three days they’re digging and building. You can check out their progress after you get home from work and email or phone your sales rep with any questions you have, rather than monitoring the crew’s work in real time.

  • Reason #6: There are better times to take vacay.

    We’re only excavating and building your pool’s shell during dig week. The concrete perimeter, coping and liner are yet to come, which means there will still be time—often up to a month—of construction before the water is in and you’ll be swimming. Instead of taking dig week off work, schedule your vacation for five or six weeks after dig date. By that time the project will be ready for your finishing touches, including sodding, planting and putting out the patio furniture. Plus, you’ll be able to enjoy your brand new pool on your vacation, instead of being woken up at 7 a.m. by construction equipment and staring at a hole in the ground.

In the end, it’s our job to make your life easier. We’re the project managers on your job. It’s our responsibility to make sure that things are done right, that you’re kept in the loop on any unexpected developments, and that you can ask questions or inquire about the project when it’s convenient for you. Vacation days are precious. Save them for when you can go swimming.

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